Unmanned Aircraft Systems On The Loose

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(March 6, 2013) The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has decided that certain non-federal agencies, police departments for example, will soon be able to have their own UAS’s. A UAS is an unmanned aircraft system, essentially a fancy name for a “drone” – like the ones that lob missiles at bad guys overseas on a daily basis – and soon here in the United States if the CIA gets its wish; but, having been pressured by industry, the FAA now intends to open the National Airspace System and below to every Tom, Dick and Harry police department for operation of their own UAS’s, or “drones”.

Drones have a very particular reputation when used by the military; not only do they provide real time surveillance, they are also used to shoot people, to blow up houses, cars, and any other living things that happen to be nearby (women, children, dogs, cats, neighbors, etc.). So, in true Government fashion, they made up a new term, “UAS’s”, which I will translate for you:

“U” stands for Unsupervised, “A” stands for Attack, and “S” stands for Stupid, a Yiddish term used to describe someone that is irresponsible and mindless – like a drone.

Homeland Security’s UAS specifications for its drones say that they “shall be capable of identifying a standing human being at night as likely armed or not.”Mark my words, there will be unannounced death from the air in our streets. There will be mid-air collisions among these UAS’s, light aircraft, and possibly airliners. There will be a violent reaction from U.S. citizens to this invasion of their privacy, and the unconstitutional deprivation of due process before they are summarily executed.

We are traveling a treacherous path!
Arthur Alan Wolk

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About Airlaw

For more than 40 years, The Wolk Law Firm has concentrated its practice in the area of aviation law, with Arthur personally generating verdicts and settlements of nearly $1 billion during the last decade alone. He is known for obtaining and on appeal, holding, the largest verdicts for each type of air accident claim in recent aviation history.

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